Mixed

Multiracial College Students Tell Their Life Stories

by Andrew GarrodRobert KilkennyChristina Gomez

Mixed presents engaging and incisive first-person experiences of what it is like to be multiracial in what is supposedly a postracial world. Bringing together twelve essays by college students who identify themselves as multiracial, this book considers what this identity means in a reality that occasionally resembles the post-racial dream of some and at other times recalls a familiar world of racial and ethnic prejudice.

Exploring a wide range of concerns and anxieties, aspirations and ambitions, these young writers, who all attended Dartmouth College, come from a variety of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic backgrounds. Unlike individuals who define themselves as having one racial identity, these students have lived the complexity of their identity from a very young age.

In Mixed, a book that will benefit educators, students, and their families, they eloquently and often passionately reveal how they experience their multiracial identity, how their parents' race or ethnicity shaped their childhoods, and how perceptions of their race have affected their relationships.

Andrew Garrod is Professor Emeritus of Education at Dartmouth College. He is coeditor of First Person, First Peoples: Native American College Graduates Tell Their Life Stories, Balancing Two Worlds: Asian American College Students Tell Their Life Stories, and Mi Voz, Mi Vida: Latino College Students Tell Their Life Stories, all from Cornell. Robert Kilkenny is Executive Director of the Alliance for Inclusion and Prevention and a Clinical Associate in the School of Social Work at Simmons College. He is coeditor of Mi Voz, Mi Vida and Balancing Two Worlds. Christina Gómez is Professor of Sociology at Northeastern Illinois University. She is coeditor of Mi Voz, Mi Vida.

Metadata

  • isbn
    978-0-8014-7914-4
  • publisher
    Cornell University Press
  • publisher place
    Ithaca, NY
  • restrictions
    Copyright © Cornell University. This book, or parts thereof, may not be reproduced in any form without permission in writing from the publisher.
  • rights holder
    Cornell University